What is postmodernism? What are the Characteristics of Postmodern Literature? | Literary Articles

 

examples of postmodern literature

Intertextuality in postmodern literature can be a reference or parallel to another literary work, an extended discussion of a work, or the adoption of a style. In postmodern literature this commonly manifests as references to fairy tales – as in works by Margaret Atwood, Donald Barthelme, and many other – or in references to popular genres such as science-fiction and detective fiction. Intertextuality in Postmodern Literature. BACK; NEXT ; The poet John Donne once wrote that "no man is an island," and for postmodernists, no text is an island. Postmodernism is all about the connections between texts, including the various ways in which one text references another (or many others). Postmodern Literature The term Postmodern literature is used to describe certain characteristics of post– World War II literature (relying heavily, for example, on fragmentation, paradox, questionable narrators, etc.) and a reaction against Enlightenment ideas implicit in Modernist literature.


Top 10 Works of Postmodern Literature - Listverse


The poet John Donne once wrote that "no man is an island," and for postmodernists, no text is an island. Postmodernism is all about the connections between texts, including the various ways in which one text references another or many others. There are all kinds of techniques that authors can use in order to highlight these links, including pastiche, parody, quotes, and direct references, as well as subtler nods to other material.

What these techniques have in common is that they're examples of intertextuality. Julia Kristeva coined the term "intertextuality" inexplaining that there are two relationships going on whenever we read a text: there's the relationship between us and the author the horizontal axis and between the text and other texts the vertical axis. It's the vertical axis that gives us our definition of intertextuality; still, both axes emphasize that no text exists in a bubble and that we need to recognize how existing works shape current texts and readings.

Intertextuality feeds into some of the big questions about literature—e. For postmodernists, it's clear that no text exists in isolation and that works of literature can only be created using stuff that already exists. Looking at it from this perspective, then, intertextuality is unavoidable: postmodern authors may enjoy drawing attention to it but it's always there.

As the theorist Roland Barthes sums up, a text is "a multidimensional space in which a variety of writings, none of them original, blend and clash" source. Another question that's been discussed a lot over the years is whether the author is in full control of the text, or whether the reader plays an active role. On the one hand, it's the author who weaves together this collection of intertextual references; however, we as readers make a mental connection.

This act involves recognizing conventions academic types call these "codes" and is something we do naturally: when we read or view any kind of text, it goes into our memory bank and shapes our responses to other texts, examples of postmodern literature.

Whatever form it takes, intertextuality treats literature as a network and invites us to pick up on how a text relates to other texts, examples of postmodern literature. This textiness sets postmodernism apart from some other literary movements that are all about realism and naturalism. Postmodernism doesn't try to disguise that a text is a construct, and that's why intertextuality is so postmodern—it reminds us of the very thing that some other kinds of texts try to keep under wraps.

Lots of postmodern fiction is intertextual, but the concept is at the core of Jorge Luis Borges' " The Library of Babel ". The story describes people's desperate, futile attempts to decode the contents of a library. With folks getting depressed as they plough on, Borges writes, "The certitude that everything has been written negates us or turns us into phantoms. Still, examples of postmodern literature idea that everything has already been written—and that there's not some "big meaning"—is the basis of postmodernism, examples of postmodern literature.

Make no mistake: this novel is examples of postmodern literature with different genres: detective fiction, memoir, examples of postmodern literature, romance, satire, fairy tale, realism, tragedy, and psychological case study. Some combo. Eliot, and we have a prime examples of postmodern literature of intertextuality. All rights reserved. Postmodern Literature.

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Postmodern literature - Wikipedia

 

examples of postmodern literature

 

Intertextuality in postmodern literature can be a reference or parallel to another literary work, an extended discussion of a work, or the adoption of a style. In postmodern literature this commonly manifests as references to fairy tales – as in works by Margaret Atwood, Donald Barthelme, and many other – or in references to popular genres such as science-fiction and detective fiction. In a Nutshell. Postmodernism is one of those words that has made itself at home in our everyday language. Just think how often you've heard a movie or a book being described as " so postmodern.". From Andy Warhol's pop art, to authors like Chuck Palahniuk and Douglas Coupland, to ultra-popular movies like Moulin Rouge, Scream, and Pulp Fiction. Postmodern Literature The term Postmodern literature is used to describe certain characteristics of post– World War II literature (relying heavily, for example, on fragmentation, paradox, questionable narrators, etc.) and a reaction against Enlightenment ideas implicit in Modernist literature.